Magnet Maintenance

Constructed from a small number of high-quality parts, the Magnet will provide years of service with only minimal upkeep. Here’s how to keep your Magnet tuned up.

Magnet Construction

This is what’s inside your Magnet, along with the few tools you’ll need to completely disassemble and reassemble it.

The core of the Magnet is an arch constructed of four interlocking sections. The injection molded body is made from durable ABS plastic with overmolded TPE rubber grips.

The Magnet’s dual-axis expansion is powered by four spring-loaded rods: one long rod in each upper arch, and one shorter rod in each foot.

Each rod is a high-quality steel part, tapped and threaded at each end for a washer-head screw. In between are two nylon washers and the spring.

Magnet Lubrication

Is your magnet a little sticky when opening and closing to insert the phone? Lubrication will take care of this quicky.

Use a silicone lubricant, like WD-40 “Specialist Silicone”. Don’t use oil-based lubricants like standard WD-40, to avoid damaging the Magnet’s plastic. Other brands are fine as well — anything silicone-based should work.

Hold the Magnet open and provide one shot to the track where the movable arch slides on the fixed arch.

And add another shot in the channel where the fixed arch inserts into the movable arch. Repeat these steps on the other side of the Magnet, then wipe off any extra with a paper towel and you should be all set!

Magnet Rod Installation

Got a screw loose? Never fear! The screws may occasionally loosen through normal operation. This is not a sign of stripped threads — the rods and screws are high-quality steel parts and are not likely to fail. A little tightening and you’ll be back in action. Here’s how:

A pair of size zero (#0) screwdrivers is all you need to tighten a loose screw or reinstall a spring-operated rod. Pliers are optional for extra tightening, but not likely necessary.

If a rod becomes loose, don’t panic! Simply remove it, and start by installing a screw at one end.

Finger-tight is probably ok at this point, because we’re going to tighten both screws again later. But if you like, grab pliers to hold the rod in place and tighten the screw with a screwdriver.

Next, slide a washer onto the rod.

And now slide on a spring until it meets the washer.

Each rod channel has two openings, one on either side of the Magnet. Locate the deeper side, which will accommodate the spring. In this example, the correct deeper opening is actually on the shorter segment of the arch, just below the seam.

Slide the rod into the channel with the washer end on the outside.

To join both halves of the Magnet, the rod must pass through a small opening in the center of the channel. This almost never happens on the first try, leaving the washer end protruding.

Never fear! Rotate the Magnet so the channel is vertical, and jiggle the Magnet side to side a few times. If you perform the Jiggle Trick™ correctly, the rod should drop all the way into the channel. This is what the rod looks like when it is fully seated.

Grab one of your screwdrivers and insert it into the screw head like you are going to tighten it. Keep pressing against the spring tension until the rod sticks out out the other side of the Magnet.

To immobilize the rod in this position while fighting spring tension, just grab the Magnet with your fingers while palming the screwdriver handle. A screwdriver with a fatter grip makes this even easier.

Now install the second washer…

…and finger-tighten the second screw.

Use your free hand to grab the second screwdriver and tighten the second screw. If your first screwdriver is still correctly threaded in the first screw head, the second screwdriver will tighten both screws at the same time.

That’s it! Repeat this process for as many rods as you need to install. When you’re done, open the Magnet a few times to make sure it’s working smoothly.